#8 (EU) Citizenship

We don’t think much about it, but most of us have one: A citizenship. We are being born as Indian, Dutch, Bulgarian, Chinese, or some other nationality. But why do we have citizenships and what rights do they bring with them?

Our first guest in 2018 is Dimitry Kochenov. Dimitry holds a professorship in EU Constitutional Law at the University of Groningen and recently published his new book “EU Citizenship and Federalism: The Role of Rights” (Cambridge, 2017). He also consults national governments and acts as an expert for leading law firms. His biggest project, made possible through support by Henley & Partners, is the Quality of Nationality Index.

This episode is mostly standing on its own. If you haven’t listened to our other episodes yet, consider listening to our first: What is Law. We might refer to certain concepts of European Union law which we haven’t yet covered in this podcast. But don’t worry: You will understand the content anyways.

Dimitry and I talk about

  • what it means to be a citizen,
  • why citizenships exist and how to gain them,
  • what rights you get by holding one,
  • how racism and sexism play a role in nationality law,
  • why the European Union created its own,
  • bus travel and how it connects to everything,
  • what Dimitry and his fellow scholars think should happen to improve citizenship law in the EU but also in national systems, and
  • much more.

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avatar Benedikt Schmitz
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avatar Dimitry Kochenov
Professor

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#5 United States Law

European lawyers tend to have a hard time with United States Law at first. Too different are “both” systems, it seems. But is the Anglo-American legal order really that different?

The fifth main episode of Maastricht Law Talk leaves the European continent for a while: It covers the United States legal system. From a federal judge being able to block the president’s executive orders to the harmonisation process of law.

Larry Catá Backer is Professor of Law and International Affairs at Penn State University. He is an expert on corporate, enterprise, and constitutional law and is currently working on his new book on an “Introduction to U.S. Law”. You can find his work and latest research on his website Backer in Law or on his blog Law at the End of the Day.

If you haven’t yet listened to our episode on constitutions, you might want to do that first. Click here to listen to the episode.

Larry and I talk about

  • the federal structure,
  • common law as a concept,
  • “codification”,
  • harmonisation of law,
  • the appointment and election of judges,
  • popular democracy and democratic deficits,
  • the U.S. Supreme Court,
  • federal and state powers,
  • the presidential election,
  • gerrymandering,
  • executive orders,
  • judicial review, and
  • much more.

If you liked this episode, subscribe here to the podcast.

avatar Benedikt Schmitz
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avatar Larry Catá Backer
Professor of Law

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#BREXIT It is not easy

This week’s episode is all about the United Kingdom leaving the European Union. With me for a second time is Aalt Willem Heringa – an expert in his field. If you haven’t listened to our episode on constitutions yet, you might want to do that first.

Aalt Willem is Full Professor of Comparative Constitutional Law at Maastricht University and recently started a research blog platform called Law Blogs Maastricht. Click here to find out more.

We talk about:

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avatar Benedikt Schmitz
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avatar Aalt Willem Heringa
Full Professor

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